Friday, 6 May 2022

On My Bookish Radar #1: Six Books That Have Piqued My Interest

There are a lot of books out there. That might be the most obvious statement I've made all year but hey, it's true. 

With that said, there are always at least a few that manage to cut through the noise and pique my interest. I'm not sure whether it's clever marketing or a 'right place, right time' situation, but I don't mind either way.

Here are a few titles that have made me think: "Huh. Sounds good. Must read that" recently.

Assembly
by Natasha Brown

Described as "exquisite, daring and utterly captivating" by Bernadine Evaristo, this 100-page short novel tells the story of a Black British woman who is about to attend a garden party at her boyfriend's countryside estate while simultaneously considering whether now is the right moment to dismantle all the carefully arranged pieces of herself.

 Blackwell's. | The Book Depository. | Hive. | Goodreads.

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Young Mungo
by Douglas Stuart

Mungo and James are best friends, despite everything that should divide them. They find sanctuary in a pigeon dovecote and in each other, falling in love and dreaming of a future in which they can experience safety and security. Their journey isn't smooth sailing and Mungo must find the strength to return to James and the future they could have together.

 Blackwell's. | The Book Depository. | Hive. | Goodreads.

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Not Quite White by Laila Woozeer


I've known Laila for many, many years. And by known I mean we've followed each other on various social platforms and checked in on each other's lives via the odd message here and there. Laila's autobiography-meets-critical-commentary, Not Quite White, sets out the ways in which media representation and pop culture impacts non-white people psychologically, emotionally and personally.

 Blackwell's. | The Book Depository. | Hive. | Goodreads.

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To Paradise by Hanya Yanagihara

A Little Life is arguably Yanagihara's most well-known work and I'm not at all embarrassed to say that it still has a hold on me several years after turning its final page. To Paradise spans three centuries, and numerous genres from historical to science fiction, and at its heart are people striving to reach their paradise in their own, very human, ways.

 Blackwell's. | The Book Depository. | Hive. | Goodreads.

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How High We Go in the Dark by Sequioa Nagamatsu

Pitched as a book that is perfect for fans of Station Eleven (hi, hello, it me!), How High We Go in the Dark opens in the year 2030 when a devastating plague is released as climate change causes permafrost to melt. The story spans hundreds of years as humanity is forced to lean on its intrinsic resilience and find new ways of living.

 Blackwell's. | The Book Depository. | Hive. | Goodreads.

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A Certain Hunger
by Chelsea G. Summers

Dorothy Daniels is a food critic who loves everything to do with food. Which is good really, given her chosen career. Dorothy also loves sex but hasn't yet found a partner who can keep up with her. Within her, though, there is something that sets her apart from everyone else. Something she has worked so hard to repress for so many years. Something murderous. Naturally, this something cannot be repressed forever and throughout the two hundred and something pages that ensue, the reader is invited into the mind of a unique and, arguably terrifying, human.

One of the top reviews for A Certain Hunger on Goodreads simply says, "we as a society should normalise milf cannibals" and frankly that's all I need to know. Sold.

 Blackwell's. | The Book Depository. | Hive. | Goodreads.

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